Sometimes it Can Get Cloudy

IEP meetings can be dreadful. Sometimes, parents can feel like it’s them against the school staff of professionals. We want to believe that everyone sitting in the room has one common denominator…the child. They want to believe that the discussions is in the best interest of the child. Sometimes, questions are posed in the parents’ minds.

Recently, I had a staff member continuously tell me “don’t get upset” about disciplinary consequences after my stance on my son not currently being in the least restrictive environment. Immediately, I thought how someone believed they could tell me what and what not to feel. After it being said more than 3 times, I began to hear “don’t be the angry black woman when your child gets in trouble” so I had to briefly address racial differences and racism in society. Now, I’m not accusing anyone in that room of being racist but the dialog hinted of racism; subtle or subconscious.

Being the only person of color in the room, I explained that I’m raising an African American son in a society when young Black boys are being shot and killed by the streets, vigilante neighbors, and police officers. My son looks older than his age (13) and is taller than the average adult male. The odds are already stacked against him and then we have to add autism to the mix. I informed them that I’ve had to spend more time teaching my child how to conduct himself in the presence of police/authority more than I’ve been able to have sex education conversations.

Race is a touchy subject and many don’t want to engage in the conversation unless they’re hiding behind a computer or smart phone. It was uncomfortable for me as well but it was necessary to say. Many of the school staff that engages with my son daily are mostly Caucasian women. Phrases like “we can’t control him” or “we fear for the safety of others and himself” have been stated to me more times than I can count.

I want to believe there isn’t subliminal racial tones occurring in meetings and conversations. I want to believe there is a genuine concern for my son and his well-being going forward. This blog isn’t to assume or imply that there is any sort of racism with the school staff but I can still acknowledge life experiences and media stereotypes plays a part when dealing with people from different races. In the end, I respect the staff 100% and I hope I have the same in return. These are the people I’ve entrusted to give my son a fair and appropriate education.

If You’re on Facebook…

I want to thank everyone that has taken the time to follow and read my blog. Although I’ve been doing this for about a year and a half, there are times when I’ve had not time to write my thoughts and experiences here, but I have a Facebook page that shares positive stories to help spread autism awareness and acceptance.

Here is our Facebook page info. Please click on the link and then “Like” to follow us there¬† as well.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!!!

https://www.facebook.com/AvengersForAutism

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Don’t Believe Him…Just Watch

When my son was diagnosed with autism, I was told to prepare for many things. Professionals said that the chances of him being independent in adulthood was slim. His ability to do daily living activities would be limited. His cognitive skills would be impaired for rest of his life.

Years later, I’m proud to say he’s on the road to independence. He recently learned how to tie his shoes(to those without children on the spectrum, that’s a big deal). He can articulate his thoughts and feelings more than ever.

I’ve been teaching him how to count money, budget, and pay bills. Also, he’s learning how to cook, wash his own clothes (which he has a strong dislike for), and clean up after himself.

We are practicing filling out job applications and have done mock interviews.

I’ve learned that obstacles can be a determining factor to succeed. A victory is much more sweeter. He has no idea that some are certain that he’s limited in acquiring skills. He knows I believe him and that, in turn, has helped him believe in himself.

I have faith that he will accomplish his goals. Yeah, it’s gonna take extra preparation but it’s not impossible. Yes, I still worry about him being able to live on his own but that’s why I teaching him now. I want to give him a fighting chance. If it doesn’t happen, I’m preparing for that as well.

Being a parent in the autism community, I know this does not apply to everybody. That’s why I’m driven to help families have hope (in any capacity) for their children. In time, I’ll share that information.

Taking Action

Life is filled with obstacles. Everyday, people face roadblocks. We all go through trials and tribulations. Some experience soaring highs whiles others go through extreme lows.

The emotional and mental roller coaster of raising a child on the spectrum is not for the weak. We’re human beings that are automatically thrown in the boxing ring. We have to fight for the rights of our children. Our opponents come from various groups. They can include doctors, therapists, school administration, insurance companies, society, and even family members.

I’ve gone up against all groups mentioned and then some. I’ve had no choice but to advocate for my son. Some seen him as just a case or diagnosis. Others, genuinely didn’t have his best interest at heart. Very few took the time to understand my son and his needs.

I struggled with what to do and what not to do. There was trial and error. I basked in the success and worried about the failed attempts.

Many times, when my son would have a meltdown, I tried to stop them. I knew spectators were judging my parenting skills. During family gatherings, it wasn’t any better. I received many unwarranted suggestion on several occasions.

The falling out on the floor, stomping of the ground, or throwing things (all while screaming and shouting) was hard to handle. I tried ignoring them or attempted to remove him from the situation along with other techniques. Sometimes it worked. Most times, it didn’t.

I learned how to listen to him with more than my ears. Now, I know that may sound crazy but I’ll explain. Babies cannot speak. We listen to their cries but we’re also observing them to pick up on their physical responses. I learned to use a similar method for meltdowns.

One day, Preston had a severe meltdown while at home. I was watching TV and he was playing nearby. It appeared out of nowhere. I was caught off guard. I felt frozen. Thinking…thinking…thinking. I could not respond to him in that moment but I closely observed him. Why was he screaming? What was wrong?¬† That’s when I heard anxiety and frustration in his voice. Then, our eyes locked. What was he trying to tell me? Suddenly, I sensed he wanted to feel love and security. He wanted my attention. I wrapped him in my arms and he began to calm down. Minutes later, he was able to verbally communicate to me what was bothering him.

Learning his various ways of communication helped me advocate for my son in ways I never thought I could. In turn, it helped get him services that were beneficial to his well being. He’s overcome so many odds and, for that, I’m extremely proud of him. He doesn’t see the obstacles. He’s simply learning how to navigate through life. I cast his worries onto me. My goal is make the mountains into boulders, if not pebbles.

Preston has taught me about overcoming the odds by facing your fears. Years ago, my brother told me he envisioned me going across high school and college campuses speaking about autism. I told him he was crazy. I used to have panic attacks when public speaking. Well, I now have to retract my statement.

While at Eastern Michigan University, I took a Human Diversity/Social Justice class taught by a brilliant professor. This professor is an extraordinary woman who’s done a tremendous amount of work for social justice. I met someone that would change the course of my life. She was a guest speaker. Patricia is a vibrant, hilarious, and strong woman who doesn’t let obstacles stop her from enjoying life. Also, she has a beautiful eye for photography. I connected with her and I came out of my shell in that moment. Now, my advocacy for my son laid the foundation but her presence and her story inspired me to do more.

Now, I’ve been invited to speak in the same class about our life with autism. I almost declined due to fear. My son has inadvertently taught me to face challenges head on. Yes, I still get nervous but it’s becoming more comfortable to do. My current challenge is how transparent can I be. I respect my son’s right to privacy. I don’t want to discuss anything he doesn’t want to share. In fairness, I’m speaking about his life. He’s right by my side at every engagement. He loves it! He likes the attention but I’m almost certain he enjoys leaving early from school as well.

I’m eternally grateful for the experience to share our story; the good, the bad, and the between. If not for the unexpected chance to spread autism awareness, I would not be as motivated to do more in the autism community. We are working something that we hope will be a benefit to those on the autism spectrum.

This journey has taught me the real simplicity of life. Be thankful for everyday. You can’t have the good without the bad. How else would you relish in the happy moments?Enjoy special moments with loved ones and grow through the hard times.

Preston and I have become closer than ever. Together, we’ve tackled challenges. We’re ready for whatever lies ahead. We’re a team and we always say “Teamwork makes the dream work”. To us, family is paramount.

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